Revolution — Sex and Drugs (S1E06)

(My review of the last episode of Revolution, Soul Train)

Before the blackout Aaron was a happily married man and rich beyond belief, but once the apocalypse hit, his money was worth nothing. During the second month, Priscilla grew ill, but was saved by a stranger named Sean who recognized dysentery. Six months after, when Aaron, Priscilla, and Sean’s group is attacked, they narrowly make it out alive. Aaron realizes how useless he is, he has no survival skills and he’s just dragging the group down. Priscilla wakes up soon after and notices that her husband is gone. Aaron left his ring behind. He knew that he would harm her chances at living and didn’t want to risk her death, so he left her in the stronger arms of Sean and watched as she walked away.

Miles brings the group to an acquaintance of his in the hopes that he can patch Nora up. As soon as they arrive, Drexel pulls guns on the crew, he clearly isn’t a real friend of Miles’. He fires a blank at Miles to scare him nearly to death, laughs, and announces out his motto, “It’s all fun and games!” None of the group feel comfortable near him, but they relinquish their weapons so his medic will check on Nora. When Nora is patched up, Miles is ready to hit the road, but Drexel demands a favor first. He is a big-time heroine dealer and wants to make sure that he stays that way, so he sends Charlie to kill the head of the O’Halloran clan, who torched his poppies.

Though Miles and Aaron try to convince her that this is cold-blooded murder and she shouldn’t resort to it, Charlie doesn’t care. She just gave up on the notion of fairness and respect in this new world, she tore up her most prized possessions, the postcards that she kept from a happier time. And with these postcards, she shredded all of her memories of her childhood and her mother. Once Charlie arrives, she discovers that Bill O’Halloran was a cop and a good man. Though she hesitates with the idea of killing him, she realizes that the only way for her friends to get out alive is if Bill doesn’t. She knocks him out with a pan and is about to stab him when Miles arrives to stop her.

With Aaron’s blessing, Miles fought his way out of Drexel’s mansion to save Charlie from making the biggest mistake of her life. As soon as Drexel notices his missing “friend,” he brings out Aaron and Nora and demands that they kill each other, the last man standing gets out alive. Though Aaron begs Nora to shoot him (Miles and Charlie can use her, but he’s just extra weight), she refuses. He resorts to shooting himself in the chest, exactly where he keeps his flask. He lifts his head and shoots the unsuspecting Drexel. His men, surprised and confused, let them go free. Miles has a hard time grasping the fact that Aaron the wimp actually killed somebody, but Aaron is quick to believe that Charlie wasn’t going to kill O’Halloran, because he wants to believe it.

General Monroe welcomes Danny with open arms, he promises him anything he wants, food, women, and a bed. Though he scolds Captain Neville in front of their newest prisoner, Monroe promotes Neville to Major in charge of information and interrogations, a position that will allow him to stay at home with his wife. Jason is eager to please Monroe, when shown the image of the pendant, he admits that Aaron has one. And he regrets sharing this information as soon as the name Strausser is mentioned, he is a frightening man who rarely leaves survivors. Which means that Charlie might not make it out alive.

Monroe didn’t lie to Rachel when he promised she would get to see her son. When Danny is brought to her he watches her for a minute before realizing who she is, but they embrace lovingly. Will he question why she left them or will he be naive enough to assume that she did it solely for their benefit?

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About MockingSilence

Just an opinionated teenage girl who watches too much TV.

Posted on November 21, 2012, in Revolution, SciFi, Fantasy, & Horror and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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